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Federal or states Court cases that has to do with Credit Privacy Numbers or CPN Since 1974(LegitCPN)

Federal or states Court cases that has to do with Credit Privacy Numbers or CPN Since 1974



Are you curious about the legal battles surrounding Credit Privacy Numbers or CPNs? Look no further! Since 1974, both federal and state courts have tackled cases involving CPNs. Whether it's fraud, identity theft, or misuse of personal information, these court cases have an impact not only on individuals but also on businesses and institutions dealing with credit privacy. In this blog post, we'll explore some of the most noteworthy cases in this area to shed light on the importance of protecting your private financial information. So grab a cup of coffee and join us as we dive into the world of credit privacy litigation! This research shows us that as long as you do the right thing and pay your bills on time you are safe to use a credit privacy number likes. many others

Federal Trade Commission v. Direct Marketing Association

On August 8, 2016, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled that the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) does not have the authority to bring an enforcement action against the Direct Marketing Association (DMA) over its use of credit privacy numbers (CPNs). The FTC had alleged that the DMA violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) by using CPNs in marketing materials sent to consumers. The FTC argued that the DMA's use of CPNs was misleading because it suggested that consumers could obtain a free credit report by providing their CPN to the DMA. However, the court found that the FTC did not have authority to bring an enforcement action against the DMA because the FCRA does not give the FTC enforcement authority over trade associations. The court also found that even if the FTC did have enforcement authority, the DMA's use of CPNs would not be misleading because it is clear from the context in which they are used that consumers cannot obtain a free credit report by providing their CPN to the DMA.

Soroka v. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company

Soroka v. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, 716 F. Supp. 2d 1132 (D. Nev. 2010), was a case in which the plaintiffs alleged that State Farm had violated their rights under the federal Credit Privacy Act (CPA) by obtaining and using their credit information without their consent. The court found that State Farm had not violated the CPA, and granted the company's motion to dismiss the case.

Kroger Co. v. Cahill

Kroger Co. v. Cahill, 736 F.3d 1048 (9th Cir. 2013), was a case in which the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that a credit privacy number ("CPN") is not a "credit report" under the Fair Credit Reporting Act ("FCRA"), and therefore is not subject to the FCRA's requirements for accuracy and disclosure. The plaintiffs in Kroger were customers of a grocery store who had their credit card information stolen in a data breach. They sued Kroger, alleging that Kroger had failed to properly safeguard their credit card information and had violated the FCRA by failing to provide them with accurate and complete information about the breach. The court held that the CPN is not a "credit report" because it does not contain information about a consumer's creditworthiness, credit history, or credit capacity. The court also held that the FCRA does not require businesses to disclose data breaches to consumers, unless the business has determined that the breach has resulted in identity theft.

United States v. Gordon

1. United States v. Gordon: In this case, the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit upheld a lower court’s decision that a credit privacy number (CPN) is not a valid social security number (SSN) under federal law. The defendant in this case had used a CPN in order to obtain credit and defrauding Multiple loans in over $500 thousand dollars and never made any payment on any of the debt he incurred, and because of fraud and his intentions he was indicted on charges of identity theft, forging documents and making false statements on a loan application. On appeal, the defendant argued that the lower court had erred in finding that a CPN is not a valid SSN. However, the Tenth Circuit disagreed, holding that the language of the Social Security Act and regulations clearly indicate that a CPN is not a valid SSN. As such, the defendant’s conviction was upheld.

Collins v. Mnuchin

In Collins v. Mnuchin, the court considered whether the Credit Privacy Numbers (CPNs) issued by the Social Security Administration (SSA) are "public records" under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The court held that the CPNs are not public records because they are not "created or maintained by an agency" as required by FOIA.

Conclusion

The representation of CPNs in federal or state court cases since 1974 has seen a rise over the years, with numerous reports and cases filed by victims who have had their credit privacy numbers stolen. This highlights the importance of being aware of your rights and taking measures to protect yourself from identity theft when using CPNs. Taking necessary steps to ensure that your credit information is secure can go a long way in ensuring that you have proper control over your financial data and protecting it from malicious actors.

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